The right to be forgotten is a concept that has been debated and put into effect in the European Union (EU) (most notably France) and Argentina in current years.

The theory stems from the request of an individual to ‘determine the development of his life in an autonomous way, without being unceasingly or periodically disparaged as a result of a specific action performed in the past.

Google Search Censorship

Individuals have the right to appeal to their national data protection regulator if the search engine refuses their request. To guarantee that such pleads are supervised smoothly, EU data protection regulators plan to draft guidelines by this autumn.

As per official reports, French residents submitted the most take down requests, filing 17,500 with Google, said a person close to the company. Germany generated 16,500 requests, Britain 12,000 requests, Spain 8,000, 7,500 from Italy, and 5,500 from The Netherlands.

The right to be forgotten ‘reflects the claim of a person to have particular data deleted so that third persons can no more trace them. It is defined as the right to silence on past events in life that are no longer occurring.

The right to be forgotten is different from the right to privacy, due to the distinction that the right to privacy constitutes information that is not publicly known, whereas the right to be forgotten involves removing information that was publicly known as a certain time and not allowing third parties to access the information.

So Does Google Really Remove The Content on Your Request?

Answer is No! Here are few excerpts published on Google where they denied the request.

Argentina: We received a phone call to remove a Google Autocomplete entry linking a politician’s name with an illicit drug. We did not remove the entry.

Bolivia: We received a request from the legislative assembly to remove a blog post that allegedly infringed copyright. Upon reviewing the blog post, we saw that it contained political speech and did not remove it.

Brazil: We received a court order to remove 107 blog posts and search results for linking to information that criticized a local government official for allegedly corrupt hiring practices. We appealed because the order did not specify why it was illegal and did not remove the content.

Cyprus: We received a request from the Anti-Drug Council to remove names of disputed territories in Google Maps. We did not remove any names in response to the request.

France: We received a request from a law enforcement agency to remove images from Google Image Search because they contained pictures of court decisions. We did not remove the images and asked the agency to contact the website owners directly.

Indonesia: We received a request through our copyright complaints submission process from an Indonesian Consul General who requested that we remove six YouTube videos. We did not remove the videos, which appeared to be critical of the Consulate.

Japan: We received a request from a local law enforcement agency to remove a blog post that describes how the police allegedly conducted a house search without a search warrant. We did not remove the blog post.

Peru: We received a request from a local government official to remove a Google Site for criticizing the local council and its members. We did not remove the site.

United Kingdom: We received a request from a local government council to remove a blog post that allegedly defames the council. We did not remove the blog post.

United States: We received a request from a local law enforcement official to remove a search result linking to a news article about his record as an officer. We did not remove the search result.

To view the complete list, visit here.